From the curator

Hydrodynamica: Remember the Future
Opening Night: Saturday, January 28th 2012, 4pm-10pm

Join us on opening night for an amazing exhibit curated by The Hydrodynamica Project.
325 15th Street
San Diego, CA 92101
in the Space4art galleries and Hydrodynamica/Loft 9 gallery

Public viewing hours through March 10, 2012
Tuesday through Saturday 10 am – 4 pm.
hydrodynamica.com
sdspace4art.org

Written by the curator/proprietor of Loft 9 Gallery, Richard Kenvin
http://hydrodynamica.blogspot.com/2011/12/hydrodynamica-participating-gallery-in.html

“Pacific Standard Time is a collaboration of more than 60 cultural institutions across Southern California coming together to celebrate the birth of the L.A. art scene. Through the exhibitions of Pacific Standard Time , you can discover how the Southland became a great center for art and culture.” – from PST exhibition guide.

A few months ago I went with Carl Ekstrom to inspect two pieces of his that were installed at the Mingei Museum for something called Pacific Standard Time, which is a massive collaboration of Southern California cultural institutions initiated by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. I went home and did some research and found that the Getty had been working on this massive joint effort for 10 years. They were on a mission to define and contextualize art and culture in Southern California from 1945-1980. The scope of Pacific Standard Time was broad: ceramics, conceptual and perceptual art, cultural identity and politics, design and architecture, the history of art spaces in Southern California, painting and sculpture, performance art, and photography and print making.

I then learned from John Van Hammersveld that PST was accepting proposals from independent galleries. So with two days left before the submission deadline I rushed together a proposal that focused on the work of Bob Simmons, Carl Ekstrom, Steve Lis, and Nick and Bear Mirandon…all of whom did their thing within the time frame of 1945-1980. I sent the proposal to the Getty. A month went by and I almost wrote it off. Then I received an email congratulating Hydrodynamica on being accepted to participate in PST.

I see this as an opportunity to continue telling a story, through surfboards and surfing, that had a tremendous impact on cultural identity in society and on the lives of individuals. Not just in California, but everywhere. Context is everything. If the story of surfing is only told from the perspective of “sport” we miss out on an incredibly rich saga filled with individuals who pioneered not just new ways to ride waves, but new ways to live. PST is a chance to acknowledge the role surfers played in Southern California’s creative realm during those years.

The more PST exhibits I visit the more I see a narrative and a story coming into focus. The forms and materials of post-war modernism in California from 1945 through the 1970s were used by surfers and reflected back to and absorbed by artists, designers, architects…and vice-versa. There is a relationship between a 1948 Simmons planing hull and a 1948 Thomas Church swimming pool. Look and see. Aerodynamic form. Curves and lines. There is a relationship between the monolithic polyester resin sculptures of Dewayne Valentine and the monolithic resin laminated boards of Simmons and Quigg. Surfers were not bit players in this drama of mid century California culture. They were in leading roles alongside the Shulmans, the Eames’, the Churchs, and the rest of the cast…

Los Angeles has always felt shadowed by New York in the realm of art. PST is an attempt to come out of this shadow. San Diego is in an even deeper shadow cast by Los Angeles. But look into the story of surfing in Southern California from 1945-1980 and you will see intense interaction, especially in the 1940s and 50s, between San Diego and Los Angeles, particularly between Malibu, Windansea, San Onofre, and the Tijuana Sloughs…and where did these guys turn their attention? To Hawaii…and that’s real root of all this stuff. Surfing in California came from Hawaii, and eventually went back to Hawaii transformed by post war materials like resin, foam, and fiberglass. George Downing and Bob Simmons patching a board together in L.A. in 1948? It happened…one of many milestones from that time. Could write a book about that one alone.

Support from friends at Volcom is helping to make this possible 🙂

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Hydrodynamica: Remember the Future opening on Saturday, January 28, 2012

Hydrodynamica: Remember the Future opening night will be Saturday, January 28, 2012 at the studios of Space4Art in downtown San Diego at 325 15th Street. The exhibition will be at the same location as Loft 9 Gallery but in a much larger space.

More information to come…

Visit http://hydrodynamica.com to learn more about The Hydrodynamica Project.

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Loft 9 Gallery/Hydrodynamica Listed as Participating Gallery in Getty-Initiated “Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

http://www.pacificstandardtime.org/galleries

See Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 press center for more information (http://pacificstandardtime.org/presscenter)

LOS ANGELES GALLERIES JOIN IN CELEBRATION OF PACIFIC STANDARD TIME: ART IN L.A. 1945 – 1980

Art Galleries to Complement Pacific Standard Time’s Robust Schedule of Museum Exhibitions and Public Programs

Los Angeles, CA, September 7, 2011—Beginning this fall and continuing through spring 2012, more than 70 art galleries in Culver City, Santa Monica, West Hollywood and the Greater Los Angeles area will join in the unprecedented cultural collaboration Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980. Exhibitions at the galleries, timed to the presentation of Pacific Standard Time, will focus on works made during (or inspired by) the Pacific Standard Time era, from the years immediately after World War II through the turbulent 1960s and 70s. As diverse as the more than 60 Pacific Standard Time museum exhibitions and programs, the shows at more than 70 participating galleries will include Pop, Minimalism, assemblage, ceramics, political graphics, printmaking, conceptual art and much more. Participating galleries will present more than 125 exhibitions, which will open throughout Pacific Standard Time’s six-month run. About 50 of these exhibitions will be on view during the opening weekend, October 1-2.

“Galleries played a critical role in L.A.’s post-war art scene,” said Andrew Perchuk, Deputy Director of the Getty Research Institute. “These spaces gave artists venues for experimentation and innovation and created a much-needed community for artists and patrons at a time when other resources for artists were scarce in Los Angeles.”

“For many L.A. art dealers, Pacific Standard Time is an opportunity to revisit the fertile period when our own practices took shape, or to honor the art that inspired us to create galleries in the first place,” stated Margo Leavin, a prominent Los Angeles gallery owner. “It is deeply meaningful for Los Angeles galleries to come together as a community to celebrate the art and artists that make Los Angeles distinct.”

Margo Leavin Gallery will present an exhibition of paintings by John M. Miller, who since the 1970s (when he began exhibiting in Los Angeles) has been investigating a single abstract composition, consisting of meticulously rendered repeating rectangles.

Many of the gallery exhibitions will present works created from 1945 to 1980, the era explored by Pacific Standard Time, while also addressing the artists’ current practices. For example, Roberts & Tilton will present Red Time, a site-specific retrospective installation by Betye Saar. An amalgamation of found, created, borrowed and recycled objects, the installation will examine Saar’s past and present work. At Gagosian Gallery, legendary sculptor Robert Therrien will create a tableau in which two- and three-dimensional objects will be displayed on and around a maze of tables, forming an historical dialogue with his own work and allowing a retrospective survey of his art.

Additional gallery exhibitions include Untitled Slide Sequence at the Christopher Grimes gallery, a key 1972 work by photographer, theorist, historian and writer Allan Sekula, which examined the socioeconomic impact of Southern California’s aerospace industry through a succession of rapidly recorded images of workers leaving the General Dynamics Conair Division factory in San Diego. The gallery L.A. Louver will present Frederick Hammersley, highlighting important developments in the artist’s long career beginning in 1940 and examining his role as part of a group of Los Angeles “Abstract Classicists” during the 1950s. Marc Selwyn Fine Art will present Lee Mullican: Paintings from the 1950s, including works from the height of the Dynaton (“that which is possible”) movement.

Some participating galleries will also showcase works by artists who have not been represented in Los Angeles for extended periods of time. At the David Kordansky Gallery, Richard Jackson will have his first Los Angeles solo gallery show in 20 years, titled The Little Girl’s Room, featuring one of his darkly humorous immersive environments—part monumental spinning sculpture, part spray painting with liquid paint and part installation, designed to look like a little girl’s bedroom. Michael Kohn Gallery will present Joe Goode’s Nighttime Series 1977 – 1978, an important group of meditative black paintings, violently slashed through the canvas, which have not been seen in more than twenty years.

Several galleries will present new works by artists who came to be seen as icons of the L.A. art scene. Among these is Robert Irwin, who will create new light sculptures and installations for an exhibition at L&M Arts. At Regen Projects, new drawings by Raymond Pettibon will continue the artist’s exploration of his signature landscape of war, politics, popular culture, art, literature, sports, religion, and sexuality.

In addition to in-depth solo shows, galleries will also present group exhibitions on themes related to the Pacific Standard Time era. Nye+Brown will present an exhibition of art, artifacts and the written word, The Lords and the New Creatures, investigating the historical relationship between Los Angeles artists and the automobile, with works by John McCracken, Billy Al Bengston, John Chamberlain, Peter Alexander, Ed Ruscha, Craig Kauffman, Larry Bell, Catherine Opie, Rob Reynolds, Brian Wills and others.

The historical role of galleries in the ascendance of Los Angeles-based visual artists will itself be the subject of some shows at participating galleries. The Cirrus Gallery, established in 1970 by Jean Milant after printing some of Ed Ruscha’s Standard Station works, promoted Los Angeles artists locally and internationally, including early participation in Art Basel. The exhibition Once Emerging Now Emerging will present a forty-year archive of L.A. art history and of Cirrus Gallery itself, organized as a rotating, four-part show aligned to the entire span of Pacific Standard Time. The four shows will focus on moments when particular artists such as Guy de Cointet and Barbara T. Smith had their early involvement with the gallery, and will also present works by international and local emerging artists of today. Cirrus Gallery will invite artists to react to the archival information through a specially created website that will funnel into the exhibition, integrating the once-emerging with the now-emerging.

Information about participating galleries and exhibitions is current as of August 2011. Beginning in early September, complete listings of the gallery exhibitions will be available online at http://www.pacificstandardtime.org. List of Participating Galleries (as of September):

1301PE
ACE Gallery
Angles Gallery
Arena 1
Art Resource Group
Bleicher Gallery La Brea
Blum & Poe
Cardwell Jimmerson Contemporary Art
Cherry and Martin
Christopher Grimes Gallery
Cirrus
Couturier Gallery
Craig Krull Gallery
David Kordansky Gallery
David Lawrence Gallery
Denenberg Fine Arts Inc
dnj Gallery
drkrm/gallery
Eames Office
Francois Ghebaly Gallery
Frank Lloyd Gallery
Gagosian Gallery
Garboushian Gallery
Gemini G.E.L
George Stern Fine Arts
Here is Elsewhere Gallery
Jack Rutberg Fine Arts
Jancar Gallery
Kantor Gallery
Kayne Griffin Corcoran
L&M Arts
LA Louver
Larry Bell Studio Annex
Leslie Sacks Contemporary
Loft 9 Gallery
Lois Lambert Gallery
Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA)
Louis Stern Fine Arts
ltd Los Angeles
Luis de Jesus
M+B
Marc Selwyn Fine Art
Margo Leavin Gallery
Merry Karnowsky Gallery (MK2 Projects)
Meyer Fine Art
Michael Kohn Gallery
MIXOGRAFIA
Monte Vista Projects
Museum of California Design: JF Chen Gallery
Nye + Brown
POP tART Gallery
PRISM
R.B. Stevenson Gallery
Regen Projects
Richard Telles Fine Art
Robert Berman Gallery
Roberts & Tilton
Rosamund Felsen Gallery
Rose Gallery
Royal/T
Samuel Freeman
Stendahl Galleries
Stephen Cohen Gallery
Steve Turner Contemporary
Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects
Tasende Gallery
The Box
Thomas Paul Fine Art
Timothy Yarger Fine Art
Tobey C Moss Gallery
Western Project 4
William Turner Gallery

About Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945 – 1980 Pacific Standard Time is a collaboration of more than sixty cultural institutions across Southern California, coming together for six months beginning in October 2011 to tell the story of the birth of the Los Angeles art scene and how it became a major new force in the art world. Each institution will make its own contribution to this grand-scale story of artistic innovation and social change, told through a multitude of simultaneous exhibitions and programs. Exploring and celebrating the significance of the crucial years after World War II through the tumultuous period of the 1960s and 70s, Pacific Standard Time encompasses developments from L.A. Pop to post-minimalism; from modernist architecture and design to multi-media installations; from the films of the African-American L.A. Rebellion to the feminist activities of the Woman’s Building; from ceramics to Chicano performance art; and from Japanese-American design to the pioneering work of artists’ collectives.

Initiated through $10 million in grants from the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time involves cultural institutions of every size and character across Southern California, from Greater Los Angeles to San Diego and Santa Barbara to Palm Springs.

Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

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: @Hydrodynamica

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Hydrodynamica: Remember the Future

Loft 9 Gallery/The Hydrodynamica Project will be presenting Hydrodynamica: Remember the Future from mid-January to February 2012 in collaboration with Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA 1945-1980.

Hydrodynamica: Remember the Future will explore the hydrodynamic planing hull surfboards of Bob Simmons, as well as work by Carl Ekstrom. Simmons’ board design and early use of composite construction processes in board building from 1949-1954 parallels California’s post-war modern design movement and was profoundly influential on the birth of modern surfing and skateboarding.

Carl Ekstrom grew up at Windansea during Simmons’ day and is one of the first surfer/skateboarders of all time. He developed asymmetric surfboards in La Jolla in 1964, which helped inspire an explosion of revolutionary surfboard design in San Diego that culminated with the designs of Steve Lis in the late 1960s.

Once overlooked and marginalized, these design school are currently experiencing a worldwide renaissance that is changing surfers perspectives on the past and changing the way people ride waves today. The exhibition will feature original Simmons planing hulls and other objects he made, including boomerangs he used to experiment with rail foils. Boards from Ekstrom, Lis, and Mirandon will also be exhibited, along with photographs and short film clips.

For more information about The Hydrodynamica Project, please visit http://hydrodynamica.com.

Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 is the largest collaborative art project ever undertaken in Southern California, initiated by the Getty Foundation. Pacific Standard Time is a collaboration of more than sixty cultural institutions across Southern California, coming together for six months beginning in October 2011 to tell the story of the birth of the Los Angeles art scene and how it became a major new force in the art world. Each institution will make its own contribution to this grand-scale story of artistic innovation and social change, told through a multitude of simultaneous exhibitions and programs. Exploring and celebrating the significance of the crucial post-World War II years through the tumultuous period of the 1960s and 70s, Pacific Standard Time encompasses developments from L.A. Pop to post-minimalism; from modernist architecture and design to multi-media installations; from the films of the African American L.A. Rebellion to the feminist activities of the Woman’s Building; from ceramics to Chicano performance art; and from Japanese American design to the pioneering work of artists’ collectives.

Initiated through $10 million in grants from the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time involves cultural institutions of every size and character across Southern California, from Greater Los Angeles to San Diego and Santa Barbara to Palm Springs. Visit http://www.pacificstandardtime.org for more information about Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980.

For more information, contact:

Loft 9 Gallery
340 16th Street, #9
San Diego, CA 92101
E-mail: rk@hydrodynamica.com; mb@hydrodynamica.com
Website: http://hydrodynamica.com
Blog: loft9gallery.wordpress.com

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Hydrodynamica Project boards

If you want a custom board, go to:

http://surfboardsbyhydrodynamica.com/hulls/mini-simmons

Ryan Burch

Tony Alva

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Bars of Soap available for purchase (handcrafted surfboards by Tyler Warren)

If you’re interested in purchasing a Bar of Soap surfboard by Tyler Warren, contact Loft 9 by e-mailing rk@hydrodynamica.com. $850 each + 8.75% CA sales tax, if applicable + shipping.

Much of Tyler’s inspiration in designing the “Bar of Soap” came from his experience riding two of Richard Kenvin’s Hydrodynamica Project boards: The White Pony and Casper. Both of these boards were inspired by the hydrodynamic planing hull surfboards created by Bob Simmons 60 years ago. To learn more visit http://www.hydrodynamica.com and http://www.surfboardsbyhydrodynamica.com

Click on “Current Show” to see more work by Tyler Warren.

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